Teaching

Courses Taught

Spring 2017
CME 456 (4 hours)

Fall 2016
CME 395 (1 hours)
CME 433 (3 hours)
CME 470 (2 hours)

Spring 2016
CME 320 (4 hours)
CME 432 (2 hours)

Fall 2015
CME 395 (3 hours)
CME 470 (2 hours)
CME 771 (0 hours)

Spring 2015
CME 320 (4 hours)
CME 395 (1 hours)
CME 432 (2 hours)

Fall 2014
CME 395 (1 hour)
CME 470 (2 hours)

Spring 2014
CME 320 (4 hours)
CME 395 (3 hours)
CME 432 (2 hours)

Fall 2013
CME 470 (2 hours)

Spring 2013
CME 320 (4 hours)

 

Course Descriptions

CME 320: Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics

This is a required sophomore-level chemical engineering course. This course gives students an understanding regarding the principles of thermodynamics as they apply to physical and chemical processes, including energy transformations and balances, phase and reaction equilibrium. Special attention is paid to open systems and the use of computer simulation software.

CME 395: Special Problems in Chemical Engineering

This course is designed for independent undergraduate research on a selected problem. Under my direction, the student is introduced to basic principles of research including literature searches, proper record keeping, and communication of research findings.  The topics vary according to the student’s interest and my available projects; however, all projects include application of high performance computing to a biomolecular system. The student is required to document model development in the form of an instructional video and accompanying documentation. It is anticipated that the student’s work will be included in research publications from my group.

CME 432: Chemical Engineering Laboratory I

This course is the junior-level chemical engineering unit operations laboratory. The students encounter a number of experiments in fluid flow, separations, heat transfer, and mass transfer. Student’s are required to design the experiment, complete it safely, and document their findings in lab reports and oral presentations. This is a team taught class, where a faculty member is responsible for a single experiment. I oversee the convective heat transfer experiment.

CME 433: Chemical Engineering Laboratory II

This course is the senior-level continuation of the CME 432 chemical engineering unit operations laboratory. Student encounter more detailed experiments in fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, separations, and chemical reaction kinetics in this follow-on lab course. The experiments entail extensive data collection and analysis and include a design component based on the experimental results. The course is team-taught, where a faculty member is responsible for a single experiment. I oversee the heat transfer experiment, examining the relationships between fluid flow, heat transfer area, and heat exchanger type on heat transfer efficiency.

CME 456: Chemical Engineering Process Design II

A lecture and problem-solving course intended to combine the principles of chemical engineering with optimization as they apply to the design of chemical processes. Results of each design case studied are presented by both oral and written reports. 

CME 470: Professionalism, Ethics, and Safety

This is a required senior-level chemical engineering course. This course introduces chemical process safety concepts including safe operating procedures, inherently safer design, hazards identification, and risk assessment. The students are required to critically assess industrial accidents and related chemical process safety concepts by identifying key faults, recommending preventative actions, and outlining Lessons Learned. Additionally, ethical problem solving strategies are discussed and related to situations the students may face in practice. The course aims to (1) develop an understanding of the importance of process safety and the commitment to maintaining a safety culture in the workplace and (2) develop a framework for ethical decision making prior to being faced with a dilemma.

CME 771: Seminar

Seminar is a zero hour course in which CME graduate students have the opportunity to observe research seminars from leading experts in the field. Invited speakers elaborate upon a broad range of research interests including both Chemical and Materials Engineering topics and hold positions within academia, national research laboratories, and industry. The students frequently have the opportunity to meet one-on-one with speakers and are encouraged to engage in research-based discussion, enhancing the graduate education experience.